Dirt Doll

Dirt Doll is an urban farm business in Chicago run by
Audra Lewicki & Adrienne Detanico.

We are dedicated to growing good food and building healthy soil. Check out our photos and leave us a note.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it, And spills the upper boulders in the sun, And makes gaps even two can pass abreast. The work of hunters is another thing: I have come after them and made repair Where they have left not one stone on a stone, But they would have the rabbit out of hiding, To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean, No one has seen them made or heard them made, But at spring mending-time we find them there. I let my neighbor know beyond the hill; And on a day we meet to walk the line And set the wall between us once again. We keep the wall between us as we go. To each the boulders that have fallen to each. And some are loaves and some so nearly balls We have to use a spell to make them balance: 'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!' We wear our fingers rough with handling them. Oh, just another kind of out-door game, One on a side. It comes to little more: There where it is we do not need the wall: He is all pine and I am apple orchard. My apple trees will never get across And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him. He only says, ‘Good fences make good neighbors’. Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder If I could put a notion in his head: 'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it Where there are cows? But here there are no cows. Before I built a wall I’d ask to know What I was walling in or walling out, And to whom I was like to give offence. Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, That wants it down.’ I could say ‘Elves’ to him, But it’s not elves exactly, and I’d rather He said it for himself. I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed. He moves in darkness as it seems to me~ Not of woods only and the shade of trees. He will not go behind his father’s saying, And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, “Good fences make good neighbors.”
- Robert Frost

Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun,
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, ‘Good fences make good neighbors’.
Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it
Where there are cows?
But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That wants it down.’ I could say ‘Elves’ to him,
But it’s not elves exactly, and I’d rather
He said it for himself. I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me~
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father’s saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, “Good fences make good neighbors.”

- Robert Frost

Rock anise hyssop illuminated in the setting sun.
Our weeknight maintenance at the farm plot has been cut short lately as the sun seems to be in a rush to set.  This, along with an increase in the hours we spend at our day jobs, has been quite a challenge. But look at that gorgeous color!

Rock anise hyssop illuminated in the setting sun.

Our weeknight maintenance at the farm plot has been cut short lately as the sun seems to be in a rush to set.  This, along with an increase in the hours we spend at our day jobs, has been quite a challenge. But look at that gorgeous color!

Young Farmers in the Western U. S. Adapt to a Water-Scarce Future

A great article about learning how to adapt to a changing climate.

Bumble bees getting what’s left of the rugosas.

Grange Future

Check out this great resource, Grange Future.

"Grange Future is a community history project undertaken by The Greenhorns to investigate the the Patrons of Husbandry as a 125 year old populist movement, and to showcase the Granges and Grange-like organizations continuing to work, and organize in this spirit. We see the Granges as an appropriate vessel for futurist, family-farm oriented community action, with a strong basis in economic theory, resistance and cooperation.”

…She put out her hand  Among the harp - like morning - glory strings,  Taut with the dew from garden bed to eaves,  As if she played unheard…
- Robert Frost

…She put out her hand
Among the harp - like morning - glory strings,
Taut with the dew from garden bed to eaves,
As if she played unheard…

- Robert Frost

Audra planted this Sumac tree with Urban Habitat Chicago two years ago.  Look how big it is already!
This tree was planted to break up the clay soil and prep the ground for eventually growing food.  Planting a fast growing tree like Sumac gets the ground ready even faster.  And when it fruits, you can grind the drupes into a powder for your hummus or for fuel for your beekeeping smoker. 
Sumac, you’re so special.

Audra planted this Sumac tree with Urban Habitat Chicago two years ago.  Look how big it is already!

This tree was planted to break up the clay soil and prep the ground for eventually growing food.  Planting a fast growing tree like Sumac gets the ground ready even faster.  And when it fruits, you can grind the drupes into a powder for your hummus or for fuel for your beekeeping smoker

Sumac, you’re so special.

Raised to Farm

The last cherry tomatoes of the season.  So long for now, toms.  It’s been real.

The last cherry tomatoes of the season.  So long for now, toms.  It’s been real.

Single-file facing east.

Single-file facing east.